Waterfalls at Havsupai

There are 5 waterfalls at Havasupai, the Fifty Foot Falls, New Navajo Falls, Havasu Falls, Mooney Falls, and Beaver Falls. Over the course of thousands of years, weather and flooding has shaped this valley to what it is today at Havasupai. Below are the waterfalls in order that you will trek into once you’ve gone past the visitor station. The turquoise color that you will see is from limestone caverns and aquifers that has been carved and built from over 3,000 years ago.

The very first waterfall you will encounter is located about 8.5 miles from the trail head and about a mile past the Supai village. Depending on you and your group, you can definitely put your feet in when you get there before heading down further to find a campsite in the campground. Like many people especially first timers, they would like to get setup in their camps before visiting all the waterfalls. One of the great features of the Fifty Foot Falls besides being beautiful are tones of travertine pools where you could lay down or sit in the middle of the river. To get there, take the side trail down to the river, head left on a less traveled trail until you reach a large pool below where the water falls. I personally think seeing Fifty Foot Falls is a great sense of relief after hiking down 10 miles from the parking lot, just to let yourself know that the trek was well worth it!

The second waterfall you will see past Fifty Foot Falls is Navajo Falls which is directly below Fifty Foot Falls. I have personally seen people jump down from above but depending on the water level, it can be very dangerous as with every other waterfall you encounter further. Ever since the 2008 flash flood at Havasu, the landscape has since changed in which the waterfall is smaller than what it used to be but still as beautiful pre-flood. The water has been labeled deceivingly shallow in some areas and it’s really tough to tell because of its’ milky color. One of the great features of Navajo Falls is the ledge that runs underneath the waterfall to allow for walking.

Whether you decide to have a break with these two first waterfalls, you could not go wrong because you are finally here in Havasupai and ready to have some fun and enjoy the activities and gorgeous scenery that you first saw a photo of online. As a warning, cliff jumping is highly discouraged due to the safety involved, play at your own risk.

The third waterfall is among the world’s most famous waterfall of them all in the Grand Canyon and possibly the whole Southwestern United Sates, Havasu Falls. Havasupai which is roughly translated “The people of the blue-green waters” in which you find the famous color at the falls. Countless of photos has made it through the internet making this camping destination a bucket list for so many. After trekking a few miles in from Supai Village, you will encounter the grandest waterfall of them all, follow the path down to the waterfall, there are several picnic tables for you to snack or bring your lunch. Make sure to bring your bathing suit to take a dip in, a heed of warning the waterfall has very strong currents and it is very easy to get sucked into the waterfall path as I have a couple times. The beautiful turquoise color you see from the pictures are from the water being stored underground – in limestone caverns and aquifers – for as much as 30,000 years.

The third waterfall is among the world’s most famous waterfall of them all in the Grand Canyon and possibly the whole Southwestern United Sates, Havasu Falls. Havasupai which is roughly translated “The people of the blue-green waters” in which you find the famous color at the falls. Countless of photos has made it through the internet making this camping destination a bucket list for so many. After trekking a few miles in from Supai Village, you will encounter the grandest waterfall of them all, follow the path down to the waterfall, there are several picnic tables for you to snack or bring your lunch. Make sure to bring your bathing suit to take a dip in, a heed of warning the waterfall has very strong currents and it is very easy to get sucked into the waterfall path as I have a couple times. The beautiful turquoise color you see from the pictures are from the water being stored underground – in limestone caverns and aquifers – for as much as 30,000 years.

The fifth and last waterfall you will encounter is Beaver Falls, unlike the rest of the falls, this is the most remote waterfall which is about 3 miles below Mooney Falls, or 3.5 miles below the campground site. It will be a total 7-mile roundtrip so be sure to start early if possible if you decide to trek down here. Depending on the season, by the time you reach down from the extended hike that the waterfall will be shaded by then with no sunlight hitting directly to the waterfall. Be sure to hike early to catch some rays if you’re opting to swim in the fall. The hike down to Beaver Falls is very rugged but very rewarding with the surrounding scenery. Beaver Falls is a stunning, cascading waterfall great for swimming and other water activities.